Chronology of U.S.-Japan Relations
Chronology

2013

  • Fact Sheet on United States-Japan Global Cooperation: Meeting Modern Challenges (Dec. 3)
  • Vice President Joe Biden's Visit to Japan (Dec. 2-4)
  • Visit to Japan by Secretary Kerry and Secretary Hagel for the 2+2 U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee meeting (Oct. 2-3)
  • President Obama meets with Prime Minister Abe at G20 Summitt (September 5)
  • Secretary Kerry meets with Foreign Minister Kishida and Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Byung-se (July 1)
  • Press Conference with Secretary Hagel and Defense Minister Onodera from the Pentagon (April 29)
  • Secretary Kerry's visit to Japan (April 14-15)
  • Consolidation Plan for Facilities and Areas in Okinawa (April 5)
  • Secretary Clinton meets with Foreign Minister Kishida (January 18)

2012

  • Secretary Panetta's visit to Japan (September 18)
  • Ambassador Roos attends Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony (August 6)
  • Secretary Clinton meets with Foreign Minister Gemba (July 8)
  • Tokyo Conference on Afghanistan (July 7-9)
  • The 40th Anniversary of the Reversion of Okinawa (May 14)
  • U.S.-Japan-Republic of Korea Trilateral Set for May 21 in Seoul (May 17)
  • President Obama Meets with Prime Minister Noda (Apr. 30)
  • Secretary Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Noda Announce Friendship Blossoms Initiative (Apr. 30)
  • U.S.-Japan Joint Statement: A Shared Vision for the Future (Apr. 30)
  • Secretary Clinton Speaks at Dinner for Prime Minister Noda (Apr. 30)

2011

  • President Obama Meets Prime Minister Noda during the APEC Summit in Honolulu (Nov. 13)
  • Secretary Clinton and Japanese Minister of Foreign Affairs Gemba Meet during the APEC Summit in Honolulu (Nov. 10)
  • President Obama Meets with Prime Minister Noda (Sept. 22)
  • Vice President Joe Biden's Visit to Japan (Aug. 22-24)
  • Remarks by President Obama and Prime Minister Kan of Japan Before Bilateral Meeting in Deauville, France (May 26)
  • Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister Matsumoto Meet in Washington (May 2)
  • Secretary Clinton Visits Japan (Apr. 17)
  • Secretary Clinton and Japanese Minister of Foreign Affairs Maehara Meet in Washington (Jan. 6)

2010

  • Republic of Korea, Japan, and U.S. Release Trilateral Statement (Dec. 6)
  • President Obama's meeting with Prime Minister Kan in Yokohama (Nov. 13)
  • President Obama Visits Japan, Attends APEC Meetings (Nov. 12-14)
  • United States and Japan Sign Open Skies Memorandum of Understanding on Air Transportation (Oct. 25)
  • President Obama's Meeting with Prime Minister Kan in New York (Sep. 23)
  • Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister Maehara Hold Bilateral Meeting in New York (Sep. 23 )
  • Futenma Replacement Facility Bilateral Experts Study Report (Aug. 30)
  • President Obama meets Prime Minister Kan at G20 Summit (Jun. 27)
  • U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee Joint Statement (May 28)
  • Secretary Clinton's visit to Japan (May 24)
  • President Obama talks with Prime Minister Hatoyama during a working dinner at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, D.C. (Apr. 14)
  • President Obama and Prime Minister Hatoyama's Statements on 50th Anniversary of U.S.-Japan Security Treaty (Jan. 20)
  • Statement of the U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee (Jan. 19)
  • Secretary Clinton Meets Foreign Minister Okada in Hawaii (Jan. 13)

2009

  • President Obama Delivers Address on Asia Policy at Suntory Hall (Nov. 14)
  • President Obama Meets Prime Minister Hatoyama in Tokyo (Nov. 13)
  • President Obama and First Lady Meet Prime Minister and Mrs. Hatoyama (Sep. 23)
  • President Obama meets with Prime Minister Aso (Feb. 24)
  • Agreement Between the Government of Japan and the Government of the United States of America Concerning the Implementation of the Relocation of III Marine Expeditionary Force Personnel and Their Dependents from Okinawa to Guam (Feb. 17)
  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's visit to Japan (Feb. 16-18)


  • President Obama administration (Jan. 20, 2009- )

2008

  • President George W. Bush's visit to Japan to attend G8 Hokkaido Toyako Summit (Jul. 6-9, 2008)
  • President Bush informs Congress of his intent to rescind North Korea's designation as a state sponsor of terrorism. (Jun. 26, 2008)
  • U.S. and Japan (U.S. Ambassador to Japan J. Thomas Schieffer and Japanese Foreign Minister Masahiko Koumura) sign a new three-year Special Measures Agreement (SMA) (Jan. 25, 2008)
  • Japanese MSDF's refueling operations to foreign military vessels in the Indian Ocean resume. (Jan. 11, 2008)

2007

  • Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda's official visit to U.S. (Nov. 16, 2007)
  • The Japanese Replenishment Support Special Measures Law expires. (Nov. 11, 2007)
  • Six-Party Talks -- Second-Phase Actions (Oct. 4, 2007)
  • U.S. and Japan Reach Agreement on Air Transport Services (Sep.18, 2007)
  • U.S. House Resolution on recognizing the strong security alliance between the Government of Japan (Sep. 5, 2007)
  • U.S. and Japan Military Security Agreement Signed. (Ambassador J. Thomas Schieffer and Foreign Minister Taro Aso )(Aug. 10, 2007)
  • U.S. House passes the "Comfort Women" resolution (Jul. 30, 2007)
  • President Bush Meets with Japanese Prime Minister Abe at at the G8 Summit, Heiligendamm, Germany (Jun. 6, 2007)
  • U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee (2+2) (May 1, 2007)
  • Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to U.S. (Apr. 27, 2007)

2006

  • Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice's visit to Japan (Oct. 18-19, 2006)
  • Japan reopening beef trade with the United States. (Jul. 27, 2006)
  • U.S., Japan agree to the U.S. deployment of Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles on bases in Japan. (Jun. 30, 2006)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's official visit to U.S., agrees a new U.S.-Japan Alliance for the 21st Century. (Jun. 29, 2006)
  • U.S., Japan cooperating on ballistic Missile interception (Jun. 27, 2006)
  • Resumption of U.S. Beef Import (Jun. 21, 2006)
  • Talks regarding the replacement of USS Kitty Hawk by nuclear-powered USS George Washington (Jun. 9, 2006)
  • Finalization of Realignment Initiatives: United States-Japan Security Consultative Committee Document: Joint Statement (May 1, 2006)
  • United States-Japan Roadmap for Realignment Implementation Issued. (May 1, 2006)
  • U.S. plans the relocation of 8,000 U.S. Marines from Okinawa to the island of Guam. (Apr. 25, 2006)
  • USDA releases an investigation report on beef exports to Japan. (Feb. 17, 2006)
  • SEC and Japan Financial Services Agency Announce Terms for Increased Cooperation and Collaboration. (Jan. 30, 2006)
  • United States-Japan GPS Cooperation (Jan. 27, 2006)
  • U.S. and Japan sign Alliance Support Agreement (Jan. 23, 2006)
  • Japan halts U.S. beef imports completely due to discovery of risk material for BSE in a U.S. beef shipment. (Jan. 20, 2006)
  • 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review Report (Feb. 6, 2006)

2005

  • Japan lifts the import ban on U.S. beef on condition that meat comes from cattle aged up to 20 months and specific parts that could transmit BSE be removed. (Dec. 12, 2005)
  • "Annual Reform Recommendations from the Government of the United States to the Government of Japan under the U.S.-Japan Regulatory Reform and Competition Policy Initiative" (Dec. 8, 2005)
  • President George W. Bush's visit to Japan, met with Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to discuss the importance of the alliance for global economic and security matters. (Nov. 15-16, 2005)
  • "U.S.-Japan Alliance: Transformation and Realignment for the Future": Japan and U.S. reach agreements to finalize reshaping the bilateral alliance including major troop redevelopment and joint exercises. ( Oct. 29, 2005)
  • U.S. accepts Japan's proposal on replacement facility for the relocation of Futemma Air Base in Okinawa. (Oct. 26, 2005)
  • Final Report on Collision Between U.S. Submarine and Japanese Fishing Vessel Ehime Maru (Oct.19, 2006)
  • Japan Defense Agency Director Yoshinori Ohno and Defense Secretary Rumsfeld agree to bilateral research on a missile defense system. (Oct. 17, 2005)
  • Japan extends legislation allowing the Self-Defense Forces (SDF) to continue its mission in the Arabian Sea as part of the war on terror. (Oct. 4, 2005)
  • The United States initiates and Japan joins the "Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate," which aimed at the development and deployment of clean, efficient technology to address environmental pollution, energy security, and climate change issues to complement the Kyoto Protocol. (Jul. 28, 2005)
  • Joint Statement: U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee (Feb. 19, 2005)
  • Report to the President and Congress Overseas Basing Commission (Aug. 15, 2005)

2004

  • U.S., Japan Launch Cooperative Program for Humanitarian Aid (Dec. 16, 2004)
  • U.S. Welcomes Japan's decision to extend its deployment of troops to Iraq. (Dec. 9, 2004)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi meets with President George W. Bush in Santiago, Chile, where the 12 th meeting of Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is held. (Nov. 20, 2004)
  • Japan, U.S. agree on policy under which Tokyo is to resume imports of U.S. beef from animals aged up to 20 months. (Oct. 26, 2004)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and President George W. Bush hold talks in New York, agree on importance of resuming bilateral beef trade at an early date. (Sep. 21, 2004)
  • Marine Corps CH-53D crashes in Ginowan City while attempting to make an emergency landing at MCAS Futenma. (Aug. 13, 2004)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi has a bilateral meeting with President George W. Bush on the occasion of the G8 Summit Meeting at Sea Island, Georgia. (Jun. 11, 2004)

2003

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture confirms 1st BSE case in U.S. Japan imposes ban on U.S. beef imports. (Dec. 2003)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi holds a summit meeting with President George W. Bush during his visit to Japan. (Oct. 17, 2003)
  • U.S., Japan Sign Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty. (Aug. 5, 2003)
  • The Law Concerning the Special Measures on Humanitarian and Reconstruction Assistance in Iraq (Jul. 26, 2003)
  • President Bush invites Prime Minister Koizumi to his ranch where the two leaders spend many hours together and deepen their trust. (May 22-23, 2003)

2002

  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visit to the U.S. on the occasion of the first anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The leaders discussed issues related to Iraq and Prime Minister Koizumi's visit to North Korea. (Sep. 12, 2002)
  • U.S. and Japan Hold First Meeting of Trade Forum. (Jul. 12, 2002)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and President George W. Bush's bilateral summit meeting on the occasion of the G8 Summit in Canada (Jun. 25, 2002)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and President George W. Bush's bilateral summit meeting held during President Bush's visit to Japan (Feb. 18, 2002)

2001

  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and President George W. Bush's bilateral summit meeting on the occasion of the APEC Economic Leaders' Meeting (Oct. 20, 2001)
  • Anti-Terrorism Special Measures Law gives authority to the Japanese Self Defense Forces (SDF) to provide "rear area" support (Oct., 2001)
  • Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visit to New York immediately after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, then meets with President Bush to express their joint resolve to wipe out terrorism in Washington, DC. (Sep. 25, 2001)
  • President George W. Bush and Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi establish the Regulatory Reform and Competition Policy Initiative (Regulatory Initiative) which is an important component of the U.S.-Japan Economic Partnership for Growth (Partnership). (Jun. 30, 2001)
  • The first summit between Prime Minister Koizumi and President Bush. They agree to strengthen the strategic dialogue between the two countries and announce a joint communiqué entitled the "Partnership for Security and Prosperity."(Jun. 30, 2001)

  • 9.11 terrorist attacks in the U.S. (Sep. 11, 2001)

    President George W. Bush Administration (Jan. 20, 2001-Jan.20, 2009)

2000

  • The U.S. and Japan reaches agreement on NTT interconnection fees and so does in time for the July 21-23 G-8 summit meeting in Okinawa. (Jul. 19, 2000)
  • While attending former Prime Minister Obuchi's funeral, President Clinton meets with Prime Minister Mori, and raised the issues of NTT's interconnection charge and Japan's financial support for U.S. troops in Japan. (Jun. 8, 2000)
  • President William Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori hold a short "get to know you" meeting in Washington. (May 4-5, 2000)
  • Japanese Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi suffered a massive stroke that left him in a fatal coma. He was succeeded by Yoshiro Mori. (Apr. 2, 2000)

1999

  • The United States, Japan, and South Korea issue a strong warning to North Korea not to carry out further ballistic missile tests at ASEAN Regional Forum. (Jul. 27, 1999)
  • The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) makes preliminary determination that cold-rolled steel imports from Japan and 11 other countries injure the U.S. steel industries. (Jul. 20, 1999)
  • The U.S. ITC makes final determination that imports of hot-rolled steel imports from Japan and several other countries injure the U.S. industries. (Jun. 11, 1999)
  • U.S.-Japan relations appears improved during the generally cordial meetings between Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi and U.S. leaders in Washington, D.C. (May 04, 1999)
  • Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi's visit to the U.S. ( May 2-4, 1999)
  • The Japanese Upper House gives final approval to the implementation of the September 27, 1997, U.S.-Japan Defense Cooperation Guidelines Agreement. (Apr. 27, 1999)
  • In his State of the Union address, President Clinton criticizes surging Japanese steel exports to the United States. (Jan. 19, 1999)
  • A Clinton administration report says that Japan is "the single largest contributor to the current pressures faced by the American steel industry." (Jan. 07, 1999)

1998

  • President William J. Clinton's visit to Japan to complete a two-day summit (Nov. 19-20, 1998)
  • The United States and Japan announces a $10 billion financing and debt restructuring initiative for struggling Asian economies. (Nov. 17, 1998)
  • The Japanese government announces a $195 billion economic stimulus plan. (Nov. 16, 1998)
  • President Clinton and Prime Minister Obuchi meet in New York. (Sep. 23, 1998)
  • China criticizes a U.S.-Japan plan to research an anti-missile defense system. (Sep. 22, 1998)
  • In New York, U.S. and Japanese defense and foreign ministry heads reaffirm pledges to revitalize the alliance; agree to cooperate on research for a missile defense system to protect Japan from North Korea's rising ballistic missile capability; and call on North Korea to honor commitments made in the 1994 U.S.-North Korean agreed framework accord. Japan agrees to push for legislative approval of a September 1997 agreement to increase Japanese defense cooperation with the United States. (Sep. 20, 1998)
  • Japan suspends talks on diplomatic relations, food aid, and support for multi-billion dollar nuclear-power reactors in North Korea on account of North Korea's launch the previous day of a nuclear-capable ballistic missile over Japan. (Sep. 1, 1998)
  • The U.S. and Japanese governments intervene in currency markets to strengthen the yen relative to the dollar. (Jun. 16, 1998)
  • Secretary of State Albright meet in Tokyo with the prime minister and foreign minister, signs an agreement to revise the Japan-U.S. Acquisition and Cross Servicing Agreement, and comments favorably on the Hashimoto government's economic stimulus efforts. (Apr. 29, 1998)
  • The 1998 U.S. trade deficit with Japan is put at $64 billion. (Feb. 26, 1998)
  • The U.S. Trade Representative sharply criticizes Japan's response to the Asian financial crisis. (Jan. 29, 1998)
  • Defense Secretary Cohen holds talks with Japanese leaders in Tokyo. (Jan. 20, 1998)
  • Japan complete review of automotive framework agreement (Jan. 1, 1998)
  • Commerce Secretary Mineta praises report on Japanese whaling
  • Two bills Proposed to help U.S. POWs used as forced labor by Japan (Jan. 1, 1998)

1997

  • An international meeting on global warming ended in Kyoto.(Dec. 11, 1997)
  • New U.S.-Japan Defense Guidelines are announced. (Sep. 24, 1997)
  • The Clinton-Hashimoto conference (Apr. 25, 1997)
  • Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto's visit to the U.S. (Apr. 24-26, 1997)

1996

  • U.S. and Japanese officials signed an agreement to substantially reduce the profile of U.S. forces in Okinawa; the SACO (Special Action Committee on Okinawa) Final Report is approved. (Dec. 2, 1996)
  • Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto's visit to the U.S., met with President Clinton at the UN General Assembly (Sep. 24, 1996)
  • Conclusion of U.S.-Japan Semiconductor talks (Aug.2, 1996)
  • President William J. Clinton's visit to Japan: "Japan-U.S. Joint Declaration on Security Alliance for the 21st Century" to endorse a plan to reduce the scope and intrusiveness of U.S. forces in Okinawa and several accords to strengthen the U.S.-Japan security alliance (Apr. 16-18, 1996)
  • Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto's visit to the U.S. (Feb. 23, 1996)

1995

  • U.S.-Japanese agreement on the sharing of the expenditures of U.S. forces in Japan (Sep. 27, 1995)
  • The statement of Prime Minister Murayama on the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II (Aug. 15, 1995)
  • A last minute U.S.-Japan compromise agreement averted U.S. imposition of trade sanctions on Japanese luxury cars.(Jun. 28, 1995)
  • The settlement of U.S.-Japanese conflict on automobile and auto parts trade (May-Jun, 1995)
  • "United States Security Strategy for the East Asia-Pacific Region" Report (Feb. 27, 1995)

1994

  • APEC's Bogor Declaration on economic liberalization (Nov. 15, 1994)
  • Japan and the United States reached agreement on some trade disputes but an unresolved dispute over auto parts prompted a U.S. investigation. (Oct. 1, 1994)
  • The Senate resolution on the Enola Gay exhibit planned by the National Air and Space Museum (Sep. 22, 1994)
  • Advisory Group on Defense issues, The Modality of the Security and Defense Capability of Japan (Aug. 12, 1994)
  • Prime Minister Murayama's positive remarks on the merit of U.S.-Japanese Security Treaty (Jul. 20, 1994)
  • Emperor Akihito's visit to the U.S. (Jun. 11-15, 1994)
  • The joint news conference of President Clinton and Prime Minister Hosokawa (Feb. 11, 1994)
  • Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's visit to the U.S. (Feb. 10-12, 1994)

1993

  • Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's visit to the U.S. to attend APEC meeting in Seattle (Nov. 19-20, 1993)
  • Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's visit to the U.S., met with President Clinton at UN General Assembly in New York City (Sep. 27, 1993)
  • The U.S. and Japan launch "Common Agenda for Cooperation in Global Perspective" (the Common Agenda). (Jul. 1993)
  • After often difficult negotiations, the United States and Japan reached agreement concerning a "framework" for U.S.-Japanese trade talks. (Jul. 10, 1993)
  • President William J. Clinton's visit to Japan to attend economic summit Meeting (Jul. 6-10, 1993)
  • The United States and Japan reach agreement on a plan to lower trade imbalance. (Apr. 16, 1993)
  • The United States and Japan reach agreement on a plan to lower trade imbalance. (Apr. 16, 1993)
  • Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's visit to the U.S. (Apr. 15-17, 1993)
  • U.S. Congress approves NAFTA. (Nov. 1993)

    President Clinton Administration (Jan. 20, 1993-Jan. 20, 2001)

1992

  • The International Peace Cooperation Law (PKO Law)
  • Press remarks by Prime Minister Miyazawa in Washington (Jul. 2, 1992)
  • Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's visit to the U.S. (Jun. 30-Jul. 2, 1992)
  • Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's visit to the U.S., met with President Bush during a UN Security Council Summit in New York City (Jan. 30, 1992)
  • President Bush's visit to Japan (Jan. 7-10, 1992)

1991

  • President Bush's remarks on the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor (Dec. 7, 1991)
  • President Bush's remarks to the Asian Society (Nov. 12, 1991)
  • Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's visit to U.S., met with President Bush in Kennebunkport, Maine(Jul. 11, 1991)
  • The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership founded. (Apr. 1991)
  • Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's visit to U.S., met with President Bush in Newport Beach, California (Apr. 4, 1991)

1990

  • The response of the Japanese Government to the Gulf Crisis (Aug. 1990- Jan. 1991)
  • President Bush's Address before Congress on the Gulf Crisis (Sep. 11, 1990)
  • The final report of the U.S.-Japanese working group on the Structural Impediments Initiatives (Jun. 28, 1990)
  • The report of the Bush administration on the Strategic Framework for the Asian Pacific Rim (Apr. 19, 1990)
  • Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's visit to the U.S., discussed bilateral trade with President Bush at Palm Springs (California) (Mar. 2-3, 1990)

1989

  • Structural Impediments Initiative (Sep. 1989-Jun. 1990)
  • Secretary of State Baker's address on "A New Pacific Partnership" (Jun. 26, 1989)
  • The application of the Super 301 provisions to Japan (May 25-26, 1989)
  • President George Bush's visit to Japan to attend the funeral of Emperor Hirohito (Feb. 23-25, 1989)
  • Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita's visit to the U.S. (Feb. 1-3, 1989)

1988

  • The U.S.-Japanese negotiations on the development of the FSX support fighter (Nov. 1988- Apr. 1989)
  • The Diet resolution against the liberalization of the rice market (Sep. 20, 1988)
  • Post-war compensation determined for Japanese-American descendents' internment (Sep. 1988)
  • The Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 (Aug. 23, 1988)
  • The U.S.-Japanese agreement on the liberalization of beef and orange markets in Japan (Jul. 5, 1988)
  • Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita's visit to the U.S. (Jan. 12-15, 1988)

1987

  • The United States Imposes restrictions on Japanese imports. (Mar. 27, 1987)
  • Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone's visit to the U.S. (Apr. 29-May 5, 1987)
  • U.S.-Japan trade dispute; the Reagan administration imposes sanctions on $300 million worth of Japanese exports to the U.S. (Apr. 17, 1987)

1986

  • Prime Minister Nakasone's remarks on the "Level of Intelligence" (Sep. 1986)
  • The decision of the Japanese government to participate in the SDI program (Sep. 9, 1986)
  • The U.S.-Japanese agreement of 1986 on semiconductor products (Sep. 2, 1986)
  • Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone's visit to the U.S., met with President Reagan at Washington and Camp David (Apr. 12-14, 1986)
  • The Maekawa's Group's report on the Structural Adjustments of the Japanese Economy (Apr. 7, 1986)
  • The U.S.-Japan joint report on MOSS discussions (Jan. 10, 1986)

1985

  • Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone's visit to the U.S., met with President Reagan in New York City (Oct. 25, 1985)
  • The agreement at the G-5 Conference of the financial ministers and the central bank governors ("The Plaza Accord") (Sep. 22, 1985)
  • Japanese measures to increase the openness of the home market (Apr. 1984-Jul. 1985 )
  • The problem of the extension of voluntary restraints of automobile exports (Mar. 1985)
  • Prime Minister Nakasone's visit to U.S. (Jan.1- 2, 1985)

1984

  • The U.S.-Japanese agreement on agricultural products (Aug. 14, 1984)

1983

  • President Ronald Reagan's visit to Japan (Nov. 9-12, 1983)
  • The Williamsburg G-7 Summit of 1983 (May 29-30, 1983)
  • Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone's visit to the U.S. for Economic Summit Meeting, Williamsburg (May 26-31, 1983)
  • Prime Minister Nakasone's visit to the U.S. in 1983 (Jan. 17-20, 1983)
  • The decision of the Japanese government to make Japanese weapon technologies available to the U.S.(Jan. 14, 1983)

1982

  • The Reagan Administration's policy toward Japan (Oct. 25, 1982, Jan. 17, 1983)

1981

  • Former Ambassador Reischauer's statement on the entry of nuclear-armed U.S. vessels to Japanese ports (May 18, 1981)
  • Prime Minister Zenko Suzuki's visit to the U.S. (May 4-9, 1981)
  • Japanese voluntary restraints of automobile exports to the U.S. (May, 1981)

  • President Reagan Administration (Jan. 20, 1981-Jan. 20, 1989)

1980

  • President Jimmy Carter's visit to Japan to attend memorial services for former Prime Minister Ohira (Jun. 9-10, 1980)
  • Japanese response to the U.S.-Iranian hostage crisis (May 19-23, 1980)
  • Remarks by President Carter and Prime Minister Ohira on signing U.S.-Japanese agreement on cooperation in science and technology (May, 1980)
  • Prime Minister Masayoshi Ohira's visit to the U.S. (Apr. 30-May 1, 1980)

1979

  • President Jimmy Carter's visit to Japan to attend economic summit meeting (Jun. 25-29, 1979)
  • U.S.-Japanese agreement liberalizing Japanese telecommunication equipment market (Jun. 2, 1979)
  • Prime Minister Masayoshi Ohira's visit to the U.S. (May 2-3, 1979)

1978

  • The Guidelines for U.S.-Japan Defense Cooperation (Nov. 27, 1978)
  • The Bonn Summit Declaration (Jul. 17, 1978)
  • Japan agrees to reduce Its trade surplus with the United States. (May 3, 1978)
  • Prime Minister Takeo Fukuda's visit to the U.S. (May 1-3, 1978)
  • U.S.-Japanese agreement liberalizing Japanese beef and orange markets (Jan. 13, 1978)

1977

  • Prime Minister Fukuda's Manila Address on Japanese foreign policy (Aug. 18, 1977)
  • Prime Minister Takeo Fukuda's visit to the U. S. (Mar. 20-23, 1977)


  • President Carter Administration (Jan. 20, 1977-Jan. 20, 1981)

1976

  • Prime Minister Takeo Miki's visit to U.S. to attend Economic Summit Meeting in Dorado Beach, Puerto Rico (Jun. 26-30, 1976)
  • Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Japan's nuclear energy policy (Jun. 8, 1976-Sep. 12, 1977)
  • The Senate hearings on the Lockheed Scandal (Feb. 4-6, 1976)

1975

  • President Ford's Address on U.S. policy in the Pacific Region (Dec. 7, 1975)
  • Emperor Hirohito's visit to the U.S. State visit; first visit to the continental U.S. In U.S. (Sep. 30-Oct. 13, 1975)
  • Prime Minister Takeo Miki's visit to the U.S. (Aug. 3-7, 1975)

1974

  • President Ford's visit to Japan and the joint communiqué (Nov. 20, 1974)
  • Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka's visit to the U.S. (Sep. 21, 1974)


  • President Ford Administration (Aug. 9, 1974-Jan. 20, 1977)

1973

  • Tokyo's Middle Eastern policy during the Oil Crisis and Washington's comments on it (Nov. 22-23, 1973)
  • The Tanaka-Nixon Joint Declaration of August 1973 (Aug. 1, 1973)
  • Japanese government switches yen to floating exchange rate system. (Feb. 1873)

1972

  • The Tanaka-Nixon Joint Declaration of September 1972 (Sep. 1, 1972)
  • Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka's visit to the U.S. (Aug. 30-Sep.1, 1972)
  • President Nixon's 1972 Foreign Policy Report (Feb. 9, 1972)
  • The Sato-Nixon Joint Statement of January 1972 (Jan. 7, 1972)
  • The U.S.-Japanese agreement on textile trade (Jan. 3, 1972)

1971

  • Announcements by the U.S. and Japanese governments on the Smithsonian Agreement (Dec. 1819, 1971)
  • Japan agrees to a 3-year deal to limit textile exports to the United States. (Oct. 15, 1971)
  • Emperor Hirohito's visit to the U.S. (Sep.26, 1971)
  • President Nixon's address announcing his new economic policy (Aug. 15, 1971)
  • President Nixon's remark's announcing acceptance of an invitation to visit China (Jul. 15, 1971)
  • The Okinawa Reversion Agreement (Jun. 17, 1971)
  • The Japanese Textile Federation's voluntary export restriction plan and the U.S. government's objections to it (Mar. 8-11, 1971)

1970

  • Prime Minister Eisaku Sato's visit to the U.S.: Joint Statement for newspapers (Oct. 24, 1970)
  • Joint Statement by Minister of MITI Kiichi Miyazawa and Commerce Secretary Maurice Stans (Jun. 24, 1970)
  • Joint Statement by Foreign Minister Kiichi Aichi and Secretary of State William Rogers (Jun. 24, 1970)
  • Automatic renewal of the Japan-U.S. Security Treaty (Jun. 22, 1970)
  • The "Nixon Doctrine" ("United States foreign policy for the 1970s : a New Strategy for Peace") (Feb. 18, 1970)

1969

  • Prime Minister Eisaku Sato's visit to the U.S. (Nov. 19-21, 1969)
  • The "Guam Doctrine," first set out in a press conference on Guam by President Nixon (Jul. 25, 1969)
  • National Security Decision Memorandum [NSDM] 13 (May 28, 1969)
  • Japanese Lower House adopts protest against America's textile import restrictions. (May 9, 1969)
  • Interview on Kennedy's Era: Edwin O. Reischauer's Oral History (Apr. 25, 1969)

  • President Nixon Administration (Jan. 20, 1969-Aug. 9, 1974)

1968

  • Japanese Foreign Ministry releases its position on "prior discussion" with the U.S. government on the Japan-U.S. Security Treaty.(Apr. 25, 1968)
  • Agreement concerning the return of the Bonin (Ogasawara) Islands to Japan (Apr. 5, 1968)
  • Prime Minister Sato's Statement in the Diet concerning the "Three Non-Nuclear Principles" (Jan. 30, 1968)

1967

  • Prime Minister Eisaku Sato's visit to the U.S. (Nov. 13-15, 1967)
  • Secretary of State Dean Rusk's Memorandum for President Johnson (Sep. 4, 1967)
  • Minutes of NSC Meeting (Aug. 30, 1967)
  • Prime Minister Eisaku Sato's and Foreign Minister Takeo Miki's call for Vietnam peace (Jul. 28, 1967)

1966

  • Secretary of State Dean Rusk's visit to Japan (Dec. 6, 1966)
  • Meeting of the Joint U.S.–Japan Committee on trade and economic affairs (1964–1966)
  • Report by American Embassy Tokyo to State Department (Jun. 26, 1966)
  • Japanese Foreign Ministry's comment on Japan-U.S. Security Treaty (Apr. 16, 1966)
  • "Zablocki Report" (Congressman Clement J. Zablocki ) and Secretary of State Dean Rusk's remarks (Feb. 17-Mar. 14, 1966)

1965

  • The agreement to establish the Asian Development Bank (Dec. 4, 1965)
  • U.S. response to Japanese foreign minister's request for utilization of GARIOA repayments (Nov. 16, 1965)
  • Edwin O. Reischauer's criticism of Japanese mass-media's report on Vietnam (Oct. 7, 1965)
  • Prime Minister Eisaku Sato's statement in Okinawa (Aug. 19, 1965)
  • Prime Minister Eisaku Sato's Visit to the U.S. (Jan. 12-14, 1965)
  • U.S. background paper for Sato's visit to the U.S. (Jan. 5, 1965)

1964

  • Secretary of State Dean Rusk comments on activities of the Joint U.S.–Japan Committee on trade and economic affairs relating to labor (Aug. 25, 1964)
  • Tokyo's announcement to allow U.S. nuclear-driven warships to call Japanese ports (Aug. 17, 1964)
  • Tonkin Gulf Incident (Aug. 1964)
  • Department of State policy paper titled "The Future of Japan" (Jun. 26, 1964)
  • Secretary of State Rusk's visit to Japan: Memorandum of Conversation between Prime Minister Ikeda and Rusk (Jan. 28, 1964)
  • Secretary of State Rusk's visit to Japan: Memorandum of Conversation between Foreign Minister Ohira and Secretary of State Rusk (Jan. 26, 1964)

1963

  • Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda's visit to the U.S. to attend funeral of President Kennedy (Nov. 24-25, 1963)
  • Japan-U.S. agreement on textile goods (Aug. 27, 1963)
  • U.S.–Japan mutual defense planning (May 10, 1963)
  • President Kennedy assassination (Nov. 22, 1963)
  • First "Hot-Line" Agreement (Jun. 20, 1963)
  • Memorandum by Assistant Secretary of Defense "Basic National Security Policy" (NSC 5906/1) (Mar. 25, 1963)

  • President Johnson Administration (Nov. 22, 1963-Jan. 20, 1969)

1962

  • Japanese FY 1962 administrative support of U.S. MAAG–Japan (Nov. 24, 1962)
  • Implementation of the U.S.–Japanese cotton textile agreement (Oct. 10, 1962)
  • Exchange of notes completing procedures regarding GARIOA Agreement (Sep. 13, 1962)
  • Treatment of Ryukyus in the U.S.–Japanese consular convention (Jul. 20, 1962)
  • Amendment of the U.S.–Japan agreement for cooperation in civil uses of atomic energy (Jun. 14, 1962)
  • Liberalization of the Japanese auto industry (May 31, 1962)
  • Activities of and change in U.S. representative on technical property committee established under Article VI of the agreement between U.S. and Japan to facilitate interchange of patent rights and technical information for purpose of defense, signed March 22, 1956 (May 10, 1962)
  • President Kennedy gives the reversion movement in Okinawa. (Mar. 19, 1962)
  • Most-favored nation provision in U.S.–Japanese consular convention (Jan. 24, 1962)
  • GARIOA Settlement Agreement (Jan. 9, 1962)

1961

  • State Department Paper on Japan (Oct. 1961)
  • Possible basic line to be taken in Japanese cotton textile negotiations (Aug. 18, 1961)
  • Ambassador Edwin O. Reischauer conversation with JSP leaders regarding JSP mission to U.S., neutralism, and American aid (Aug. 1961)
  • Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda's visit to the U.S. (Jun. 20-23, 1961)
  • Japanese government reaction to U.S. military assistance planning concepts for Japan (May 26, 1961 )
  • Approach to government of Japan for special arrangements under the peace treaty and ex gratia payment: war claims of inhabitants of the Trust Territory of the Pacific (May 23, 1961)
  • Report on Toyota Motor Company relationship with Ford Motor Company (Mar. 15, 1961)
  • Ambassador Douglas MacArthur II's farewell speech: "The Evolution of the Japanese–American Partnership" (Mar. 14, 1961)
  • Japanese cotton textile program for 1961 (Feb. 24, 1961)
  • U.S.-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange (CULCON) holds first joint conference (Jan. 1961)

  • President Kennedy Administration (Jan. 20, 1961-Nov. 22, 1963)

1960

  • Technological assistance agreements negotiated by Japanese government as of September 30, 1960 (Dec. 2, 1960 )
  • Conversations between Ambassador Douglas MacArthur II and Michisuke Sugi, president, Japan Export Trade Promotion Agency (Aug. 3, 1960)
  • Meetings of U.S.–Japan Joint Committee for Implementation of the Status of Forces Agreement (Jun. 1960)
  • NSC 6008/1 "United States policy toward Japan" (Jun. 11, 1960)
  • The Haggerty Incident; White House Press Secretary James Haggerty's visit to Japan is cut short because of angry Zengakuren, caused a cancellation of President Eisenhower's visit to Japan. (Jun. 10, 1960)
  • U.S. forces, Japan, labor requirements, and labor utilization planning information (Feb. 19, 1960)
  • U.S.–Japan science cooperation: further background conversations on possible projects for outer space (Jan. 20 1960)
  • Prime Minister Nobusuke Kishi's visit to the U.S. (Jan. 17-21, 1960)
  • Signing of Japan-U.S. Security Treaty and Related Agreements (Jan. 19, 1960)
  • Status of the United Nations in Japan under the new Japan–U.S. security treaty (Jan. 14, 1960)

1959

  • Report by American Embassy in Tokyo to State Department (Oct. 1, 1959)
  • Ambassador Douglas MacArthur II's report to State Department (Feb. 21, 1959)

1958

  • Foreign Minister Aiichiro Fujiyama's visit to the U.S. (Sep. 11-12, 1958)
  • NASA Formed (Jul. 29, 1958)
  • Memorandum of Conversation between President Dwight Eisenhower and Secretary of State John Foster Dulles concerning Okinawa (Apr. 1, 1958)
  • Memorandum by Assistant Secretary Walter Robertson for Secretary of State John Foster Dulles "Reappraisal of U.S. policies toward Japan" (Mar. 28, 1958)
  • Memorandum by Secretary of State John Foster Dulles for Assistant Secretary Walter Robertson(Mar. 23, 1958)
  • Report by Ambassador Douglas MacArthur II to Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and Assistant Secretary Walter Robertson (Feb. 12, 1958)
  • Report by Ambassador Douglas MacArthur II to Assistant Secretary Walter Robertson (Feb. 3, 1958)

1957

  • Report by Ambassador Douglas MacArthur II to Secretary of State John Foster Dulles (Nov. 15, 1957)
  • Exchange Letters between Japan and U.S. regarding the relationship between the Security Treaty and UN Charter (Sep. 14, 1957)
  • International Atomic Energy Agency (Jul. 1957)
  • Prime Minister Nobusuke Kishi's visit to the U.S. (Jun. 16-22, 1957)
  • Letters between Japan and U.S. concerning the resolution by the Japanese Upper House banning atomic and hydrogen bombs (Mar. 20, 1957)

1956

  • Japan admitted into the United Nations (Dec. 21, 1956)
  • State Department Memorandum on the Japan-Soviet negotiations (Sep. 7, 1956)
  • Secretary of State John Foster Dulles' comments on the Japan-Soviet negotiations (Aug. 19/Aug. 28, 1956)
  • The "Price Report" (Jun. 13, 1956)
  • U.S.'s position on the "Northern Islands" (Mar. 10, 1956)

1955

  • Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu's visit to the U.S. (Aug. 29-31, 1955)
  • NSC 5516/1 "U.S. Policy Toward Japan" (Apr. 9, 1955)

1954

  • Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida's visit to the U.S. (Nov. 8-10, 1954)
  • President Dwight Eisenhower's "Domino Principle Theory" speech (Apr. 7, 1954)
  • The MSA Agreements (Mar. 8, 1954)
  • The "Judd Report" (Mar. 3, 1954)

1953

  • The Amamis returns to Japan (Dec. 24, 1953)
  • Nixon's speech at the Japan-American Society (Nov. 19, 1953)
  • Japanese Prime Minister special envoy Hayato Ikeda - Assistant Secretary Walter Robertson Talks (Oct. 5-30, 1953)
  • Secretary of State John Foster Dulles's visit to Japan and his proposal to return the Amamis (Aug. 8, 1953)
  • Letters between Japanese and U.S. Governments concerning Mutual Security Assistance Program (Jun. 24, 1953)
  • Japan-U.S. Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation (Apr. 2, 1953)

  • President Eisenhower Administration (Jan. 20, 1953-Jan. 20, 1961)

1952

  • First Hydrogen Bomb (Nov. 1, 1952)
  • NSC 125//2, "United States Objectives and Courses of Action with Respect to Japan" (Aug. 7, 1952)
  • Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952/MacCarran-Walter Act (Jun. 27, 1952)
  • Treaty of Peace between Japan and the Republic of China (Apr. 28, 1952)
  • Administrative Agreement under Article III of the Security Treaty between Japan and the U.S. (Feb. 28, 1952)

1951

  • Yoshida Letter (Dec. 24, 1951)
  • Treaty of Peace with Japan (Treaty of San Francisco) (Sep. 8, 1951)
  • Security Treaty between the United States and Japan (Sep. 8, 1951)
  • Joint U.S.-U.K. draft Peace Treaty with Japan (Jul. 12, 1951)
  • Conversations between Secretary of State John Foster Dulles and Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida (Apr. 18-23, 1951)
  • Provisional U.S. draft of a Japanese Peace Treaty (Mar. 23, 1951)
  • Memorandum by the Japanese government, "Initial Steps for Rearmament Program" (Feb. 3, 1951)
  • Memorandum by Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida, "Suggested Agenda" (Jan. 30, 1951)

1950

  • Principles on Japanese Peace Treaty set force by the U.S. government (Nov. 24, 1950)
  • Japanese draft of a security treaty between Japan and the U.S. (Oct. 11, 1950)
  • President Truman's statement on the intention of initiating preliminary discussions on Japanese Peace Treaty (Sep. 14, 1950)
  • Gen. MacArthur's Memorandum of June 23, 1950 on concept governing security in post-war Japan (Jun. 23, 1950)
  • Conversation between Hayato Ikeda, Finance Minister of Japan, and Joseph Dodge, Finance Advisor to Gen. MacArthur (May 2, 1950)
  • Secretary of State Dean G. Acheson at the National Press Club (Jan. 12, 1950)
  • NSC-68 (Apr. 1950)
  • Treaty of Friendship, Alliance and Mutual Assistance between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the People's Republic of China (Feb. 14, 1950)

1949

  • Statement by Joseph M. Dodge, Finance Advisor to Gen. MacArthur, concerning the Japanese economic stabilization (Mar. 7, 1949)

1948

  • NSC13/2, "Recommendations with Respect to United States Policy Toward Japan" (Oct. 7, 1948)
  • Conversation between Gen. MacArthur and George Kennan, Director of the policy planning staff of the State Department (Mar. 5-21/Mar. 25, 1948)
  • Secretary of the Army Kenneth C. Royall's speech on U.S. policy for Japan (Jan. 6, 1948)
  • Marshall Plan (Apr. 1948)

1947

  • General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) (Oct. 30, 1947)
  • Foreign Minister Hitoshi Ashida Memoranda (Jul. 26/Sep. 13, 1947)
  • U.S. National Security Act merges the War and Navy Department into the Defense Department, and creates Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and National Security Council (NSC). (Jul. 26, 1947)
  • Japanese Constitution drawn up by the U.S. occupiers (May 3, 1947)
  • Gen. MacArthur's press remarks on the peace settlement with Japan (Mar. 17, 1947)
  • The Truman Doctrine (Mar. 2, 1947)

1946

  • Atomic Weapon Test at the Bikini Atoll in the Pacific (Jul. 1, 1946)
  • The International Military Tribunal for the Far East tries Japanese leaders on charges of war crimes. (Jun. 6, 1946-Nov. 12, 1948)
  • The UN establishes the Atomic Energy Commission (UNAEC) (Jan. 24, 1946)

1945

  • Communique on the Moscow Conference of the Three Foreign Ministers (Dec. 26, 1945)
  • U.S. initial post-surrender policy for Japan (Sep. 22, 1945)
  • Authority of General MacArthur as Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (Sep. 6, 1945)
  • Instrument of surrender on board the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay (Sep. 2, 1945)
  • The Imperial Rescript for ending the war (Aug. 14, 1945)
  • Communications exchanged in connection with surrender (Aug. 10-14, 1945)
  • The United States drops atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. (Aug. 6-Aug. 9, 1945)
  • U.S. Forces invade Okinawa. (Mar. 19, 1945)
  • The internment of people of Japanese ancestry ends. (Jan. 2, 1945)
  • Potsdam Declaration (Jul. 26, 1945)
  • V-E Day, the German government's acceptance of an unconditional surrender (May 8, 1945)
  • Yalta Agreement (Feb. 11, 1945)

  • President Truman Administration (Apr. 12, 1945-Jan. 20, 1953)

1944

    The Battle of Leyte Gulf. (Oct. 23-Oct. 25, 1944)
  • Gen. MacArthur returns to the Philippines. (Oct. 20, 1944)
  • Tojo resigns. (Jul. 18, 1944)
  • Breton Woods Conference for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD)(Jul. 1-Jul. 22, 1944)
  • U.S. warplanes first major raid on the Japanese home islands (Jun. 16, 1944)

1943

  • Teheran Conference (Nov. 28-Dec. 1, 1943)
  • Cairo Conference (Nov. 22-26, 1943)

1942

  • Manhattan Project (Aug. 13, 1942)
  • Battle of Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands (Aug. 7, 1942)
  • Battle of Midway (Jun. 3-6)
  • Japanese forces occupy Rangoon. (Mar. 9, 1942)
  • Relocation of 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry to camps in the western interior (Feb. 19-Mar. 29, 1942)
  • Japanese forces begin occupation of the Dutch East indies. (Jan. 11, 1942)
  • United Nations Declaration for Allied unity (Jan. 1, 1942)

1941

  • Germany and Italy declare war on the United States. (Dec. 11, 1941)
  • U.S. congress declares war on Japan. (Dec. 8, 1941)
  • Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Philippines, Guam, Hong Kong, and other bases. (Dec. 7, 1941)
  • President Roosevelt appeals to Emperor Hirohito to preserve peace and withdraw from Indochina. (Dec. 6, 1941)
  • Secretary of State Hull and Japanese diplomats open negotiations. (Nov. 20, 1941)
  • Gen. Tojo Hideki becomes Prime Minister of Japan. (Oct. 18, 1941)
  • Atlantic Charter. (Aug. 12, 1941)
  • The Japanese occupation of Indochina; President Roosevelt freezes all Japanese assets and credits in the United States. (Jul.24, 1941)
  • Lend-Lease Act passed by Congress. (Mar. 11, 1941)

1940

  • Japan joins Germany and Italy in a ten-year alliance. (Sep. 27, 1940)
  • President Roosevelt proclaims an embargo on the export of scrap metal, directed at Japan. (Sep. 26, 1940)
  • Secretary of State Hull warns the Japanese on the move against French Indochina. (Sep.4, 1940)
  • The U.S.-Japan Trade Agreement expires; Secretary of State Hull informs Japan that the U.S. intends to abide by the agreement on an interim basis. (Jan. 26, 1940)

1939

  • Scientists including Albert Einstein urge Roosevelt to initiate research into atomic weapons. (Nov. 10, 1939)
  • World War II; Great Britain and France declare war on Germany. (Sep. 3, 1939)

1938

  • The United States and Japan exchange notes on the Open Door Policy. (Oct. 6-Dec. 31, 1938)

1937

  • Panay Incident; Japanese warplanes sink the USS Panay, the Japanese government quickly apologizes. (Dec. 12-14, 1937)
  • The Shino-Japanese War begins. President Roosevelt chooses not to apply the Neutrality Act. (Jul. 7, 1937)
  • Japanese Invasion China (Jul. 1937)

1936

  • Anti-Comintern Pact with Japan and Germany (with Italy the following year)(Nov. 17, 1936)
  • Japan withdraws from the London Naval Conference (Jan. 15, 1936)

1934

  • Japan announces it will no longer observe the Washington Naval Treaty. (Dec. 29, 1934)
  • Babe Ruth visits Japan; good will baseball games played nationwide (Nov. 1934)

1933

  • World Economic Conference (Jun. 12-Jul. 27, 1933)
  • Japan withdraws from the League of Nations. (Mar. 27, 1933)
  • President Franklin Roosevelt begins the process of taking the country off the gold standard. (Mar. 4, 1933)
  • Hitler rise to power in Germany (Jan. 1933)

  • President Roosevelt Administration (March 4, 1933-April 12, 1945)

1932

  • Lytton Commission Report (Oct. 4, 1932)
    World Disarmament Conference (Feb. 2, 1932)/i>
  • Shanghai Incident (Jan. 29, 1932)
  • Stimson Doctrine; the United States pronounces nonrecognition of Japanese actions in Manchuria. (Jan.7, 1932)

1931

  • Mukden Incident, part of South Manchurian railway destroyed (Sep. 30, 1931)
  • The Bank of England withdraws from the gold standard. (Sep. 21, 1931)
  • Manchurian Crisis (Sep. 18, 1931-Feb, 1933)

1930

  • London Naval Conference, Japan, United States and Great Britain agree to limits on cruisers, destroyers, and submarines. (Jan. 21-Apr. 22, 1930)

1929

  • Stock Market Crash, beginning Great Depression (Oct. 29, 1929)<

  • President Hoover Administration (Mar. 4, 1929-Mar. 4, 1933)

1928

  • Kellogg-Briand Pact (Aug. 27, 1928)

1927

  • United States, Great Britain, and Japan discuss limitations on the construction of cruisers, destroyers, and submarines. (Jun. 20-Aug. 4, 1927)
  • First sound motion picture (Oct. 6, 1927)
  • Charles A. Lindbergh flight across Atlantic (May. 20-21, 1927)

  • President Coolidge Administration (Aug. 2, 1923-Mar. 4, 1929)

1925

  • Geneva Protocol (Jun. 17, 1925)

1924

  • Johnson-Reed Act (Japanese Exclusion Act), an immigration quota law, passed (May 1924)

1920

  • First meeting of League of Nations (Jan. 10, 1920)

1919

  • In response to Japanese demands, Wilson agrees to allow Japan special rights to Shantung. (Apr. 28, 1919)
  • Treaty of Versailles, ending World War I (Jun. 28, 1919)

1917

  • Russian Revolution (Nov. 1917)
  • American entry World War I (Apr. 6, 1917)

1915

  • United States Announcement, not recognizing any Japanese gain at China's expense (May, 1915)
  • The Twenty-One Demands to China, issued by Japan (Jan. 18, 1915)

1914

  • World War I in Europe (Aug. 1, 1914)
  • Panama Canal opened (Aug. 1, 1914)

  • President Wilson Administration (Mar. 4, 1913-Mar. 4, 1921)

1911

  • North Pacific Sealing Convention, resolving pelagic-sealing dispute with Japan and Russia (Jul. 7, 1911)
  • Chinese Revolution (Oct. 1911)

1910

  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace founded

  • President Taft Administration (Mar. 4, 1909-Mar. 4, 1913)

1908

  • Root-Takahira Agreement commits Japan and United States to maintain the status quo in the Pacific. (Nov. 30, 1908)

1907

  • Great White Fleet (Dec. 16,1907-Feb. 22, 1909)
  • Gentlemen's Agreement, whereby Japan promises to restrict emigration to ease U.S.-Japan tensions. (Feb. 24, 1907)

1905

  • Portsmouth Treaty, signed by Russia and Japan after negotiations coordinated by Theodore Roosevelt (Sep. 5, 1905)
  • Taft-Katsura Agreement, recognizing territorial status quo in Far East (Jul. 29, 1905)

1902

  • Anglo-Japanese Alliance (Jan. 30, 1902)

  • President Roosevelt Administration (Sep. 14, 1901-Mar. 4, 1909)

1894

  • Shino-Japanese War (Aug. 1894-Apr. 1895)
  • Uchimura Kanzo studies abroad at Amherst University (Nov. 1884)
  • Nitobe Inazo studies abroad at Johns Hopkins University. (Sep. 1884)

  • President Cleveland Administration (Mar. 4, 1893-Mar. 4, 1897)

1882

  • U.S.-Korean Treaty, recognizing independence of Korea (May 22)
  • Chinese Exclusion Act passed, restricting Chinese immigration into the United States for ten years (May 6)

  • President Arthur Administration (Sep. 19, 1881-Mar. 4, 1885)

1871

  • The Iwakura mission sets off to tour the U.S. and Europe. (Nov.)

1862

  • American bark "Cheralie" shipwrecked, the crew are treated with humanity by Hitachi Province. (Nov. 22 )
  • Minister Resident Robert H. Pruyn's credentials (May 17)
  • Townsend Harris return to the U.S. (Apr. 26)
  • Robert H. Pruyn, Harris' successor arrives. (Apr. 25)
  • Civil War (1861-1865)

  • President Lincoln Administration (Mar. 4, 1861-Apr. 15, 1865)

1860

  • The first Japanese mission to the U.S. (Feb.13)

1858

  • "The Treaty of Amity and Commerce between the United States and Japan" (Shimoda Convention) (Jul. 29)

  • President Buchanan Administration (Mar. 4, 1857-Mar. 4, 1861)

1856

  • Consul of State Townsend Harris' credentials (Sep. 25)

1855

  • President Franklin Pierce names Harris Consul General to Japan.

1854

  • Treaty of Peace and Amity (Convention of Kanagawa) (Mar. 31)
  • Crimean War

1853

  • Four black ships led by USS Powhatan and commanded by Commodore Matthew Perry, anchor at Edo (Tokyo) Bay. (Jul. 8)

  • President Pierce Administration (Mar. 4, 1853-Mar. 4, 1857)



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